Comparison of the Orbital Fossa Dimensions of Men and Women

Authors

1 Associate Professor, Department of Anatomy, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

2 Lecturer, Department of Anatomy, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

3 Ph.D. Student, Department of Anatomy, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

4 General Practitioner, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

Abstract

Background & Aims: The orbital cavity is an important anatomic structure in the face. It is in close connection with the skull, paranasal sinuses, and the nose. Precise knowledge of the orbital cavity dimensions can be helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases associated with the orbital cavity. Due to the lack of adequate research on orbital size in Iran and the city of Kerman, the aim of this study was to evaluate the proportions of the orbital fossa of women and men in Kerman. Methods: In the present study, a sliding caliper and a compassed caliper were used for the measurement of variables. The variables included orbital width, orbital height, and inter-orbital distance. The variables were measured in 2000 subjects in the age range of 20-30 years. Results: The mean orbital height and width in men was 35.8 and 41.6 mm, respectively. The mean orbital height and width in women were 23 mm and 33.1 mm, respectively. In addition, the mean inter-orbital distance in men and women was 31.9 mm and 24.1 mm, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, the statistical analysis of the variables showed no significant difference in orbital height, width and inter-orbital distance between men and women

Keywords


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