Nasal Colonization Rate of Community and Hospital Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Hospitalized Children

Authors

1 Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran Tropical and Infectious Diseases Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

2 Resident of Pediatrics, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

3 Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

4 Staff Member, Department of Microbiology, Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

Abstract

Background & Aims: Prevalence of community and hospital acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is increasing. The primary reservoir is the anterior nares; and nasal carriage is a risk factor for infection in a variety of populations. Infection due to hospital-acquired colonization is different from community acquired in clinical manifestations and antibiotics susceptibility. In this study, we investigated nasal colonization rate and antimicrobial susceptibility of community and hospital acquired staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization at childhood. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in children admitted at Kerman Afzalipour hospital, Iran, during June to November 2011. Sample was taken from nostrils of 180 patients in the beginning and after 48 hours of admission for staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization and antibiotics susceptibility test. Results: Of 180 samples at the beginning of hospitalization, 22 (12.2%) had staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization; from these, 18.1% were methicillin-resistant (2.2% of total population). Methicillih-resistant staphylococcus aurous colonized children had significantly greater mean age than non-colonized (P < 0.001). After 48 hours, 22 (12.2%) were colonized with staphylococcus aurous; from these, 11 (50%) were hospital acquired methicillih-resistant. All methicillih-resistant staphylococcus aurous isolates were sensitive to vancomycin. The rate of resistance to the other current in-use antibiotics was more common in hospital acquired staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion: Community acquired methicillih-resistant staphylococcus aurous is sensitive to many antistaphylococcus agents in our region. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in admitted patients can occur. Empirical antibiotics recommendation in nosocomial infection should be on the base of periodic culture and antibiotics susceptibility test.

Keywords