Document Type : Original Article

Authors

1 Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

2 HIV/STI Surveillance Research Center, and WHO Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

3 Professor in Epidemiology, HIV/STI Surveillance Research Center, and WHO Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

4 Assistant Professor of Gerontology Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health Research Center for Social Determinants of Health Institute for Futures Studies in Health Kerman University of Medical Sciences

5 Modeling in Health Research Center, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

Abstract

Introduction
Substance abuse in women has an increasing trend in all socio-economic classes. In addition to the fetal consequences, this problem has many other economic and social consequences as well.
This study aimed to determine the prevalence of substance abuse and its related factors in pregnant women.
Materials and Methods
This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed employing a self-administered valid questionnaire on 587 pregnant women in Kerman, Iran who referred to public health centers and private offices to receive prenatal care. Participants were recruited from January to February 2020 using a multistage sampling method.
Results
The most prevalent substances used during pregnancy (current use) were waterpipe (8.5%), opium (2.6%), and alcohol (1.7%).
Substance abuse in first-degree relatives was a very strong correlate of substance abuse in pregnant women (OR = 7.26). The low level of education of pregnant women's husbands was also a strong predictor of substance abuse in pregnant women. (OR = 3.15).
Conclusion
Since substance abuse by family members was the strongest correlate of drug abuse during pregnancy, family-based interventions should be tailored to address early detection of such vulnerable women and necessary counseling services.

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